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Understanding Your

   Hereditary Cancer

              Screening Options

Cancer and Genetics

Cancers that run in families can be caused by an abnormal gene that is passed from generation to generation. Although this is often referred to as inherited cancer, what is inherited is the abnormal gene that can lead to cancer, not the cancer itself. Approximately 5 to 10% of all cancers are thought to result directly from gene defects or mutations inherited from a parent.

Hereditary cancer mutations can be passed on in a family

Many of the variants associated with hereditary cancers are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. This means if you have a mutation in one of these genes, then your children have a 50% chance of inheriting the same variant.

Other relatives may be at risk to carry the same mutation. Testing is the only way to find out.

It is important to share test results with family members.

How does the test work?

A buccal swab or blood sample is collected and sent to our lab for testing. Once we receive the sample, we will test your DNA Results are then sent to your physician within 3 to 4 weeks.


What do the results tell you?

Testing does not tell you if you currently have cancer. Your test results tell you about your inherited risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, or other cancers.

Examples of hereditary cancer syndromes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, affecting about 1 in 8 (12.5%) women in their lifetime.

5-10% of breast cancer cases are due to inherited causes. Hereditary breast cancer tends to occur earlier in life than non-familial cases and is more likely to occur in both breasts.

The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes appear to be responsible for approximately one-half of hereditary breast cancer. However, additional genes are associated with increased breast cancer risk as well. Mutations in the genes included in the Comprehensive Panel can confer an estimated 20–87% lifetime risk for breast cancer.


Ovarian Cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women in developed countries, affecting approx. 1 in 71 (1.4%) women in their lifetime.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most common causes of hereditary ovarian cancer, but several other genes are associated with increased ovarian cancer risk as well.


Colorectal Cancer (CRC) affects about 1 in 20 (5%) men and women in their lifetime.

Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary CRC, but other genes included in the Comprehensive Panel are also associated with increased CRC risk.


Uterine Cancer affects about 1 in 38 (2.6%) women in their lifetime.

Increased risk for uterine cancer has been identified in a number of hereditary cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome and Cowden syndrome.


Prostate Cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the United States, after skin cancer.

Hereditary prostate cancer may be diagnosed at younger ages and may also be more aggressive. For example, BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations have been shown to be associated with more aggressive prostate cancer.

Comprehensive Inherited Cancer Gene Test includes the following genes:

45 genes linked to Breast, Ovarian, Endometrial, Colorectal, Lynch Syndrome, Gastric, Melanoma, Pancreatic, Polyposis, Prostate, Renal, Thyroid/Parathyroid, Uterine and other major cancers.

APC, ATM, BARD1, BLM, BMPR1A, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, CDH1, CDK4, CDKN2A, CHEK2, EPCAM, FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCE, FH, MEN1, MET, MITF, MLH1, MRE11, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, NF1, NTRK1, PALB2, PMS2, POLE, POLD, PTCH1, PMS2, PTEN, RAD50, RAD51C, RAD51D, RET, SMAD4, STK11, TP53, VHL